Brittany Gilliland

Brittany began her college career at Converse College and transferred to Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, a decision she felt was best for her. She graduated in May 2018 with a Bachelors in Creative Writing and a minor in Religious and Women’s Studies (and a major GPA of 3.79!). She became engaged on campus serving as co-president ASCEND and co-founder of faith-based organization FENNA. During her final semester, she attended the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Tampa, Fl., which she funded through a financial award from Agnes Scott and supplemented by a Bridges Engaged Learning award.

 

Today, Brittany pays it forward by working in administrative support for the Office of the Provost at Emory University. She says, “I get to help support those making important advances in student success and academic affairs, particularly with a focus on equity and first-generation low-income students.”

 Here is more, in his words, about his journey.

In her words

“The Hal Warlick scholarship was really the hallmark reason I was able to attend any college in the first place, second only to the support I got from Bridges. They took a chance on me and then supported me even further when I decided to transfer schools two years after I was initially awarded my scholarship. It's honestly one of the biggest blessings I've been given. They took the burden off wondering if I'd have to rely on loans that could have ensnared me for a long time after my graduation and my family didn't have to choose between paying an essential bill and helping me pay for school costs."

Her advice for students

 

“Never give up on yourself; you are your own biggest cheerleader at the end of the day. Where there is a will, there is a way to do anything you dreamed of. In 2014 I made the difficult decision to not attend my dream school for financial reasons. Two years later, I got my grades up and I transferred to my dream school with even more scholarships but I had to leave the friends I'd made at my first college, which was incredibly difficult to do, and start over at a new school. My academic experience and career were much better for it when I had faith in myself and was determined to thrive though and I think everyone can benefit from that.”